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Operational ecology

Swiss Life has set targets for operational ecology which are set out in a Group-wide directive. At the same time, Swiss Life is helping to make its employees more conscious of environmental and climate protection and organises awareness-raising activities at the various locations.

Climate-related operational ecology goals of the Swiss Life Group

Greenhouse gas1

Swiss Life wants to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 10% by 2021.

Electricity

Swiss Life wants to increase the share of electricity it uses in its buildings from renewable energy sources with a target of reaching 100% by 2021.

Fossil fuels

Swiss Life wants to continuously reduce its use of fossil fuels in its business premises within its investment cycles.

1 The reference base for this goal per FTE is 2016 and it covers Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions.

In the course of 2021, Swiss Life will define new subsequent goals for its operational ecology beyond 2021.

Key environmental data on operational ecology are gathered annually in accordance with the globally recognised standard of the Association for Environmental Management and Sustainability at Financial Institutions (VfU). By gathering data on an annual basis, Swiss Life is able to determine where progress has been made, where risks lie and where steps must be taken. The VfU’s key figures conform to the international Greenhouse Gas Protocol standards (Scope 1, 2 and 3). The data are gathered, evaluated and analysed across the Group. All the major Swiss Life locations have environmental officers who collect the data for the individual divisions. The data are consolidated and analysed at Group level. Following the extensive professionalisation of operational ecology, Swiss Life has set itself the goal of continuously improving data quality. Thus, in 2020, additional locations were included in the data collection and the share of extrapolations and estimates could be further limited.

Absolute climate-related indicators¹

    2020   2019   2018   2017
Total energy consumption (in MWh)   40 755   51 694   49 500   47 819
Electricity (in MWh)   22 645   32 570   32 011   31 557
Heating (in MWh)   12 666   13 937   15 933   14 759
District heating/cooling (in MWh)   5 444   5 187   1 556   1 503
Renewable electricity (in MWh)   20 167   23 080   15 890   17 868
Proportion of renewable electricity (in %)   89   71   50   57
Business travel (in million km)   26.8   61.9   68.8   63.1
Total greenhouse gas emissions (in t)   13 611   23 657   24 436   22 788
Greenhouse gas emissions Scope 1 (CO2 equivalents in t)   5 423   6 596   9 341   8 667
Greenhouse gas emissions Scope 2 (CO2 equivalents in t)   1 271   4 808   3 439   2 935
Greenhouse gas emissions Scope 1 and 2 (CO2 equivalents in t)   6 695   11 404   12 780   11 601
Greenhouse gas emissions Scope 3 (CO2 equivalents in t)   6 916   12 254   11 656   11 186

Relative climate-related indicators per full-time equivalent position (FTE)¹

    2020   2019   2018   2017
Total energy consumption (in KWh/FTE)   4 149   5 540   5 614   5 823
Electricity (in KWh/FTE)   2 306   3 491   3 631   3 843
Heating (in KWh/FTE)   1 290   1 494   1 807   1 797
District heating/cooling (in KWh/FTE)   554   556   176   183
Renewable electricity (in KWh/FTE)   2 053   2 474   1 802   2 176
Business travel (in km/FTE)   2 729   6 634   7 804   7 686
Total greenhouse gas emissions (in kg/FTE)   1 386   2 536   2 771   2 775
Greenhouse gas emissions Spope 1 (CO2 equivalents in kg/FTE)   552   707   1 059   1 055
Greenhouse gas emissions Scope 2 (CO2 equivalents in kg/FTE)   129   515   390   357
Greenhouse gas emissions Scope 1 and 2 (CO2 equivalents in kg/FTE)   682   1 222   1 449   1 413
Greenhouse gas emissions Scope 3 (CO2 equivalents in kg/FTE)   704   1 313   1 322   1 362
1 Further companies were included in the data collection process in 2020. The key figures for financial years 2019 and 2020 refer to VfU 2018 while those for the other years refer to VfU 2013.

Further information can be found in the Sustainability Report (section “Operational Ecology”).